©2002
All rights reserved.

<< GO BACK <<

"Symmetrical as a butterfly, its copper roof cantilevered out 26 feet at each end, the house, constructed of stone, mahogany and glass, faces south across the Navesink River in Monmouth County. In keeping with forms the house incorporates, its architect, Donald Mallow, has used five tons of copper for the massive roof, which nonetheless appears to float.

“A roof that sails, as this roof does, needs to be copper, rather than slate or tile,” Mr. Mallow said. Copper roofs last for 50, 100, 150 years...

...Very few architects have an opportunity to work in residential architecture of this scale, said Richard B. Snow, a retired professor of architectural design at Cooper Union. “Mallow is a very powerful designer with great structural technique”...

...“The site always makes its needs felt,” he [Mallow] said ... “Where's the sun, the view, the breeze, the slope of the land?”...

...As individual problems arose, Mr. Mallow solved them with the whole structure in mind. Each detail, each separate solution makes a ripple. If every solution respects the total, the synthesis is a building that is a work of art...

...The space is extraordinary. The foyer opens into a central hall that rises 22 feet to a coffered ceiling. Mahogany doors, 10 feet 2 inches tall, can shut off the dining room. At either end is a fireplace that also opens up into the bedrooms on the floor above...

...What is most extraordinary, what separates building from architecture, is the way by which each detail echoes or extends the central design, an interweaving that goes through the house. "We feel the continuity of the plane as we move through space," is the way Mr. Mallow described the experience of the new residence...

...Mr. Mallow made his first commitment not to architecture but to painting. For the three years he spent at the Music and Art High School in Manhattan, he believed he would be an artist. He entered Cooper Union, still believing it. But there he encountered architecture and found himself fascinated. He went on to Yale, where he received his architecture degree and particularly relished his time with Louis Kahn, an architect and important influence on Mr. Mallow...

...[Mallow's] summer house and its studio use local materials and simple structural technique and take landscape into account. As Mr. Mallow said, “Designing a house in a vacuum is not solving the problem.”"

The New York Times
Sunday, December 2, 1990

<< GO BACK <<